home..

Final Project - Vox Automata

group page // repo source files // objectives

Contents

objectives >

work work

presentation >

files >

(using new tree command that should expedite listing files)

link to repo

src/
├── ecad
│   └── motors.zip
├── mcad
│   ├── r2r_asm_rev2.zip
│   └── vector
│       ├── 7510A44_Plastic Syringe.DXF
│       ├── autoBlade^autoBladeHolder.DXF
│       ├── single.DXF
│       ├── tile.DXF
│       └── upright.DXF
└── sw
    ├── a4988_nano
    │   └── a4988_nano
    │       └── a4988_nano.ino
    ├── attiny1624
    ├── serialstep_nano
    │   └── serialstep_nano.ino
    ├── serialstep_samd11c
    │   └── serialstep_samd11c.ino
    └── updi_samd11c
        ├── sam_ba_SAMD11C14A.bin
        └── SAMD11C_serial
            ├── README.md
            ├── SAMD11C_serial
            │   └── SAMD11C_serial.ino
            └── SAMD21E_serial
                └── SAMD21E_serial.ino

13 directories, 14 files

conceptual idea >

flex fabrication flow >

work

machine cad >

work work

prior weeks work >

acknowledgements >


starting from this point onwards, all progress is recent first, oldest last (reverse chronological order). In lieu of a post/blog system for this page, this is how I organized my documentation.


progress >

up to local eval deadline >

post presentation >

presentation >

up to presentation >

mosaics >

vinyl cut stencil >

dump5 >

work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work

2022.06.09 - printer #4 >

dump4 >


A E S T H E T I C >

work work work work

assembly >

work work work

motor mounts >

work work work work work work work work work work work work

t-nut assembly (flexure) >

work work work work

t-nut assembly (bed) >

work work work work work

t-nut assembly (bed) >

work work work work work

frame assembly (aluminum) >

work work work work

tapping aluminum >

work work work work

frame assembly >

work work work work work work

urumbu board assembly, debugging >

work work work work work work work work work

safety pin >

work work work work work

urumbu board assembly, debugging >

work work work work

plastic layering for usb thickness >

work work work work work work work work

urumbu + samd11c board spiral history >

work work work work work

(SLA resin part for foam crawler has yellowed over time next to window) >

work

routing >

work work work work

identified shaft too short (wobble) >

work work work work

helix cut >

work work

ppe >

work

placing artwork >

work work work

misc >

work work work work work


dump3 >

work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work


xy flexure testing >

began xy flexure exploration by looking at ULB’s urumbu flexurexy implementation.

work first print was on an: Ender 3, 0.4mm nozzle, 0.3mm height, 100mm/s, PLA. fortunately, I learned the importance of brims on the inside of the print. Unfortunately, I did that a little late.

work work work

the flexure still functions fine, but the warping makes it unsuitable for a dimensionally stable motion stage.

the file I’m using to print is a render from the openscad file from ULB. I will likely reimplement in solidworks to modify it to suit size of my machine, but for now printing the example is enough to test fabrication.

now back at my apartment, I kicked off another print to continue testing fabrication of the xy stage. Ender 3, 1mm nozzle, 0.8mm height, 25mm/s, PLA.

work

This print has a weak joint that was spurred on by where the print started on that layer. I identified the setting that affects the start location, but need to fiddle with it to fix this problem.

work

Side by side, plus one of the stepper adapters from the ULB project.

work

dump2 >

work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work work

sequence (spiral 1) >

desktop reel-to-reel >

I really enjoyed the time I spent during machine week working on Dan’s Foam Crawler. Unfortunately, I haven’t spent nearly as much energy making sure the wristLogger has gotten far enough.

Based on competing requirements from work, research, life (and existing work done), I’m deciding to pivot from making the wristLogger to making this currently unnamed desktop reel-to-reel set of machines.

prototyping vs volume >

what is reel-to-reel? >

Reel-to-reel is shorthand for continuous manufacturing in industries that use “reels” of material. These reels are fed through multiple machines and typically both start and end as spools, or reels of material.

reel example

Materials used for reeling are typically thin enough to be reeled, with a reasonable curvature radius. If the material is too thick, the curvature becomes too large, and the reel becomes difficult to transport.

motivation >

I’ve noticed a capability gap between low-volume prototyping and high-volume manufacturing. Neil has alluded to this capability by mentioning print farms in the past, or distributed scaling. Existing methods are insufficient to cover this gap:

I am specifically interested in applying this scaling process to electronics. FPC and molded devices come to mind. Scoping with respect to fabacademy, I want to focus on FPC.

FPC block diagram: blockDiag

some additional steps that apply to this sequence:

priority >

given the complexity of these machines and getting them to play nice with each other, I intend to focus efforts on the following machines for first spirals:

machine design >

What’s unique about this set of machines?

From working on my variant of Dan’s Foam Crawler, I learned quite a few things.

architecture - urumbu >

Urumbu has been eye-opening. Basic idea is atomization of each actuator in a machine allows very flexible software manipulation of different machine stages. Rather than having to spec out a control board capable of some upper limit of motors, all you need to do is add motor boards driven by additional usb ports.

This makes transforming eg a 3-axis machine to a 5-axis machine trivial architecturally.

One might think of this as a single machine gaining additional arms, but another way to think about this is adding multiple single machines (functions) together into a sequence of machines, without having to necessarily figure out how to move parts between machines.

motion system - rollers >

I’ve learned that rollers are an effective motion system for moving various media. However, as it exists, it’s not the most suitable for variable thickness, fragile parts (like unsoldered electronics strips).

I plan to change the rollers to gears w/ indexing teeth, which can be used to feed the parts reel-to-reel (literally why they’re named the way they are). Figuring out how to keep tolerance tight will be essential.

With flex, this may be solved by adding some rigid backing material. If I were doing reel-to-reel with copper reels, tolerancing concerns would likely be eliminated.

resolution, error correction - flexures and computer vision >

existing motion system for toolhead is belt driven. This works great for larger build volumes, but may suffer for smaller, very high resolution build volumes.

Neil recommended flexure motion systems awhile back for high repeatability, w/ the caveat that they have tiny build volumes. Fortunately, that’s exactly what I need in this scenario.

Additionally, I’ve done some work in computer vision awhile back for (get this) registration between different manufacturing stages. I don’t know how feasible it is to bring those ideas back to life in such a short period of time, but they would add a lot of resilience to error accumulation between stages. I’d probably seriously consider it after moving past reflow and test stages (so spirals 2, 3, onwards).

reel-to-reel - reel >

It will likely be important to keep the reel under tension, especially for FPC. If not, I expect curvature to occur in the substrate, which would mess with any of the stages in this system.

Not an actual picture of reel-to-reel continuous manufacturing, but similar principle shown in this cartridge-based camera design: cartridge

fabrication >

Based on what I’ve learned previously and the new requirements for the build volume (and partially being inspired by Dan’s Foam Crawler but not just recreating a smaller Foam Crawler), I believe I can expedite the fab process for constructing a single machine.

If we treat a machine as a volume product, we need to optimize how long it takes/bom count, etc. for contruction.

Things to try:

electronics >

Refer back to work in machine week for prior work. New developments will be shared here.

h-bridge

controller

schematics >

pcb >

spiral 1 >

reflow unit >

multimeter unit >

spiral 2 >

solderpaste extrusion >

Neil referenced Jake’s work in this clay printer for the leadscrew for paste extrusion. Extruding solderpaste is on the list of machines I want to do, but it is part of

© 2022 Alan Han   •  Powered by Soopr   •  Theme  Moonwalk